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Playlist changes music format

Discussion in 'Ripping, Converting, Files & Formats' started by wkiser, May 30, 2016.

  1. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    Trying to burn an MP3 CD for my car. For songs in AAC format, I've created a duplicate in MP3 format. I created a Playlist to house the songs to burn to disc. When I drag or add the newly created MP3 format song to the Playlist, it shows up as AAC. Only songs that are already in MP3 format can be moved to the Playlist and keep that formatting. If I allow the AAC formatted song to remain in the Playlist and proceed with the CD bun, it won't burn the AAC formatted songs (not surprisingly). Does making a Playlist involve iTunes Match? I do use that service. I'm using OSX 10.9.3 and iTunes 12.4.0.119 on an iMac. Any help would certainly be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    You can't burn songs that aren't on your computer. Maybe that's the problem?
     
  3. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    Thanks for your prompt reply. And for your most interesting columns in Macworld. You raise a very basic issue and I'm not sure how to respond. The AAC formatted songs would be ones I have purchased thru iTunes. I have some labeled AAC Matched which, I believe, were originally mp3 with a low bit-rate that have been upgraded to 256 bit-rate thru Match. When I purchase a song thru iTunes, I assumed that it downloads onto my iMac and shows up as an AAC file. Is that not correct? I don't subscribe to Apple Music so I'm not streaming anything. I've then duplicated that song as an mp3. Is that duplicate not truly resident on the iMac?
     
  4. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    Hmm... Why did you duplicate tracks as MP3s? If you "upgraded" tracks with Match, then you'll have downloaded the 256 kbps AAC files to your computer. There's no need to convert them. They'll say that they're matched files, but they don't have DRM, so you should be able to burn them.
     
  5. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    I wanted to burn a CD with mp3 files to play in a car CD player that will play mp3. I saw 3 choices in iTunes for the type of CD to burn: regular CD to play in any player (only holds 20-30 songs); mp3 CD which will hold 100+ and will play in suitable CD player; and data CD for computer use. At least, that's how I interpreted the choices. I wanted to burn an mp3 CD so all songs have to be in mp3 format. I wasn't using any of the AAC Matched songs. These were AAC songs I purchased from iTunes last week. Since they were AAC format, I wanted to have an mp3 version to add to the Playlist to burn. When I dragged the mp3 version to the Playlist, it somehow became an AAC format and wouldn't burn on the mp3 CD. Thanks for your patience.
     
  6. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    iTunes burns an MP3 CD by converting any tracks that aren't MP3s to that format. So fill up the playlist with whatever you have, and it should work. I haven't done this in years, though, but I don't think it's changed.
     
  7. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    Thanks for your continued involvement and replies. I just tried your suggestion. It doesn't work. I created a new Playlist, added several songs in a variety of formats (AAC, Matched AAC, mp3), and tried to burn an mp3 CD. When iTunes analyzes the songs, I get a warning that some songs won't be burned to the CD. For each song not in mp3 format, it says that the song must already be in mp3 format to burn it to an mp3 CD. That was my original problem. I thought that having iTunes duplicate the song as an mp3 would solve the problem. It doesn't. So my question in it's basic form is "How can I use iTunes to burn an mp3 CD that includes songs currently in AAC or Matched AAC format?"
     
  8. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    I just went to try it out, but then I quickly realized that I don't have any CDs. I'm moving to a new house next week, and I've already packed my blanks (which, surprisingly, I have a lot of; I haven't burned a CD in years).

    This article confirms that the tracks must be in MP3 format:

    https://support.apple.com/kb/PH12348

    I had thought that it was able to convert the files. So I guess you need to convert the files first, and use the MP3 copies to burn the CD.
     
  9. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    Again, thanks. That article confirms the way I thought it worked. That article also has a link (https://support.apple.com/kb/PH12367?locale=en_US&viewlocale=en_US) to directions of how to convert a DRM-free song to mp3 format. I again just converted 4 Matched AAC songs to mp3 format. They show up on my music as "MPEG audio file". I assume that's mp3. Then, when dragged to the Playlist, the songs show up as Matched AAC songs. And won't burn on the CD because they're not mp3. The cynical side of me wonders if Apple is allowing folks to "upgrade" their music for no charge using iTunes Match but then somehow controls what happens with that song if you try to convert it. It's still a puzzle to me that I can't solve. Good luck with your move.
     
  10. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    That's odd. It certainly has something to do with iTunes Match. And, yes, MPEG Audio File is MP3.

    I actually tried to "upgrade" some files yesterday that I had bought from Amazon a while back. I added them to my library that uses iTunes Match and iCloud Music Library, and some of the tracks immediately showed as Apple Music tracks. Others were uploaded, even though all the tracks are in the iTunes Store and on Apple Music. Some showed as Error. Others as Ineligible. Go figure.

    So the only thing I can suggest is trying to burn your CD by turning off network access to the computer, adding the tracks, and then seeing what happens. Perhaps if iTunes Match and iCloud Music Library can't change anything it might work.
     
  11. Jon_Eric

    Jon_Eric New Member

    wkiser - I think the issue you are running into is that iTunes Match is working behind you and replacing your newly created MP3 files with AAC files before you can get them burned to CD. If I remember correctly, you can temporarily turn it off by unchecking iCloud Music Library in Preferences.
     
  12. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    Bingo! Kirk & Jon_Eric got it. I went through the same process with wi-fi turned off. Without access to iTunes Match, the songs stayed mp3 when added to the Playlist. When I turned wi-fi back on, the songs were quickly converted to AAC. So, an additional step needs to be added when trying to create an mp3 CD that contains currently formatted AAC files. You need to either disconnect from wi-fi or temporarily stop iTunes Match while converting songs to mp3, adding them to the Playlist, and burning the CD. Thanks so much for your help on this. Problem solved. And, Kirk, were you really posting at 4:34 am?
     
  13. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    I'm still surprised that iTunes Match is converting the files; it's not supposed to do that, unless you delete the originals, and then re-download the files from the cloud. I actually tried upgrading some MP3 files yesterday, as I said above, and none of the local files were converted.

    And re the time: I live in the UK.
     
  14. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    The local files remain as mp3 until you add them to a Playlist. Then, they are converted back to AAC. Not sure why Apple would want that to happen but it does.
     
  15. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    I just added an MP3 file to my iTunes library. I waited for iCloud Music Library to update. (Which took several minutes.) I then dragged the file to an existing, empty playlist. It was still an MP3 file. It shows as Matched, but the file itself hasn't been changed.

    I'm very curious about this, because it should not be happening as you describe. Can you document the entire process with screenshots, showing the File tab of the Info window at each step? If this is really what's happening to you, I'd like to contact Apple about it.
     
  16. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    After making a duplicate mp3 file, I chose to add it to iCloud Music Library. That seemed to "save" it in mp3 format. I could then add it to a Playlist without loosing the mp3 format. Interesting that during this testing, I'm now getting messages that I'm unable to connect with iCloud Music Library. Don't know what that's about but it has temporarily sidetracked me to try and figure out what's going on. I'll try to send you screenshots but that's getting out of my comfort level and will take a little work. I certainly appreciate your interest.
     
  17. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    Others have reported iCloud Music Library problems yesterday.

    If you can take screenshots, I'd appreciate it. If not, no worries. It's just that it's the best way to document what happens.
     
  18. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    Hopefully, I can get these screen shots posted correctly. First, I again created an MP3 version of the song (The Twelfth of Never). That was by going to File, Convert, Create MP3 version. It was very quickly duplicated. The first screen shot.
    Then I wanted to check the File status so I right clicked and selected Get Info. I got the warning dialog box. The second screen shot.
    I clicked proceed and got the File info. It shows the file as an MP3. The third screen shot.
    I then dragged the song to the Test mp3 Playlist. It was added. I again checked the File info. It now shows as Matched AAC audio file. The fourth screen shot.
    Hope this may help.

    Screen Shot 2016-06-05 at 1.02.26 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-06-05 at 1.03.15 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-06-05 at 1.03.34 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-06-05 at 1.04.13 PM.png
     
  19. wkiser

    wkiser New Member

    Kirk,
    As I look at the File Info for the two songs I just posted, I noted the song that now shows up in the Playlist is actually the original song and format. It identifies the song as added 8/6/11 and modified 4/4/12. The newly created MP3 song was added and modified on 6/5/16. So iTunes is adding the original song (the one in iCloud Music Library) rather than the newly created MP3 version. Could that be because of the warning dialog box in the second screen shot? iCloud Match won't, or hasn't yet, matched the MP3 version so iTunes won't put it into the Playlist. I'm just guessing. I should wait for some more expert analysis. Thanks.
    Wendell
     
  20. kirk

    kirk Administrator Staff Member

    This is odd. Perhaps it has something to do with the fact that you've got the file in two formats. The AAC file was added to your library before iTunes Match even existed. Can you try doing the same thing, but removing the AAC file after you convert to MP3; then add the file to the playlist.

    I've never understood that dialog...
     

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